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  • £143.00

    Compass - Timothy Claeyé

    Compass - Timothy Claey? - 13'05'' - BVT055 A musical journey around the world in four mouvements. In the 1st mouvement, 'Europe Express', we go on a fascinating trip through Europe. Attentive listeners might hear some influences by London, Paris or Madrid. In part two we move on to the east, 'Across Asia'. The trip takes us first into Arabia, where the flutes are smuggling us via the Silk Road into China. The saxophones take care of a typically Jewish klezmer sound. In part three - Yes We Can (The American Dream) -we fly to the swinging United States. Before returning home, we quickly go 'Down Under'.

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  • £8.25

    DEEP RIVER (Programme Concert Band Extra Score) - Geldard, Bill

    Extra Score. Deep River was first published in 1875 and was made popular by a small choir from Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, who performed across the United States and Europe. For this arrangement, Bill Geldard draws on his vast experience in the world of Big Bands and this brings back memories of the 20's and 30's style, particularly the likes of Duke Ellington and Count Basie. Duration 4:56

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  • £40.95

    DEEP RIVER (Programme Concert Band) - Geldard, Bill

    Deep River was first published in 1875 and was made popular by a small choir from Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, who performed across the United States and Europe. For this arrangement, Bill Geldard draws on his vast experience in the world of Big Bands and this brings back memories of the 20's and 30's style, particularly the likes of Duke Ellington and Count Basie.

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  • £45.95

    HAVEN'T MET YOU YET (Hot Pop)

    Haven't Met You Yet is the first single by Canadian jazz singer Michael Bubl from his 2009 album, Crazy Love. Since its debut, it has soared the charts in the United States, Europe, Canada, and Australia. Bring the fresh, pop sounds of contemporary crooner Michael Bubl to your ensemble with Haven't Met You Yet. American Grade 2

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  • £70.00

    O Christmas Tree Wind Band Set (Score & Parts)

    The tradition of the Christmas tree in Western Europe dates back to a time long before any Christianization had taken place. During the severely cold winter nights, so it was believed, evil spirits tried to 'kill' nature. Needle-leaved trees were the only ones which kept their green colour throughout the year, and therefore became symbols of immortality. These 'living' trees, said to be the work of benign spirits, were brought into people's houses to ward off evil, life-threatening powers. In the 14th century people first started to decorate Christmas trees. It was a pagan custom, originated by the inhabitants of Alsace. This custom was taken over by the Church in the course of the 15th and 16th century. At first the decoration consisted mainly of edibles, such as apples and wafers, but later small presents were added. Legend has it that the reformer Martin Luther was the first person to decorate a Christmas tree with candles. The flickering candle flames were meant to create the image of a starry sky in which Christ's apparition could be recognized. The German organ-player Ernst Anschtz from Leipzig was the first person to notate the song 'O Tannenbaum', the melody being a well-known folk song. Next to 'Stille Nacht' 'O Tannenbaum' is the most famous German Christmas song, now known throughout the world. In the United States of America the melody of 'O Tannenbaum' has even been used in four States (among which the State of Maryland) for their State song. In David Well's arrangement the song is first heard as many of us know it. After this introduction, however, it is transformed into a solid rock version, and the beat has been changed. In the second part the familiar three-four time is back, but here the rhythm is different from the original. After the richly ornamented rock beat the basic theme can be heard once again and the composition is concluded in a festive manner. 03:15

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  • £43.95

    TU UNGANE (Concert Band) - Watson, Scott

    Tu Ungane (Swahili, pronounced TOO une-GAH-nay) means "Let's join together" and refers both to musicians coming together to play as well as African and Western styles merging musically. Western musical styles such as Gospel, Blues, and Jazz owe much to African influence. African music has been influenced by the West as well, fusing British military and brass band music, along with the hymns and ongs of missionaries from Europe and the United States, with tribal folk elements. Tu Ungane explores his musical cross-pollination incorporating the Tanzanian folk song "Asali Ya Nyuki" ("Honey of Bees") and original musical material in the style of the British-African fusion.

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  • £44.55

    Up On the Housetop (Concert Band - Score and Parts)

    Ever wonder what Santa listens to as he flies around the world on his annual Christmas trip? Jerry Williams has checked up and found out how "Jingle Bells" sounds as Santa passes over Japan, Mexico, Europe, Scotland, England, Russia, and of course, the United States. A novel medley that's appealing and amusing.

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  • £44.95

    Haven't Met You Yet - Words and music by Michael Bublé, Alan Chang, and Amy Foster

    Haven't Met You Yet is the first single by Canadian jazz singer Michael Bubl from his 2009 album, Crazy Love. Since its debut, it has soared the charts in the United States, Europe, Canada, and Australia. Bring the fresh, pop sounds of contemporary crooner Michael Bubl to your ensemble with Haven't Met You Yet.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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  • £43.50

    Tu Ungane - By Scott Watson

    Tu Ungane (Swahili, pronounced TOO une-GAH-nay) means "Let's join together" and refers both to musicians coming together to play as well as African and Western styles merging musically. Western musical styles such as Gospel, Blues, and Jazz owe much to African influence. African music has been influenced by the West as well, fusing British military and brass band music, along with the hymns and songs of missionaries from Europe and the United States, with tribal folk elements. Tu Ungane explores this musical cross-pollination incorporating the Tanzanian folk song "Asali Ya Nyuki" ("Honey of Bees") and original musical material in the style of the British-African fusion. This title is available in SmartMusic.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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  • £78.00

    O Christmas Tree - David Well

    The tradition of the Christmas tree in Western Europe dates back to a time long before any Christianization had taken place. During the severely cold winter nights, so it was believed, evil spirits tried to 'kill' nature. Needle-leaved trees were the only ones which kept their green colour throughout the year, and therefore became symbols of immortality. These 'living' trees, said to be the work of benign spirits, were brought into people's houses to ward off evil, life-threatening powers. In the 14th century people first started to decorate Christmas trees. It was a pagan custom, originated by the inhabitants of Alsace. This custom was taken over by the Church in the course of the 15th and 16th century. At first the decoration consisted mainly of edibles, such as apples and wafers, but later small presents were added. Legend has it that the reformer Martin Luther was the first person to decorate a Christmas tree with candles. The flickering candle flames were meant to create the image of a starry sky in which Christ's apparition could be recognized. The German organ-player Ernst Anschtz from Leipzig was the first person to notate the song 'O Tannenbaum', the melody being a well-known folk song. Next to 'Stille Nacht' 'O Tannenbaum' is the most famous German Christmas song, now known throughout the world. In the United States of America the melody of 'O Tannenbaum' has even been used in four States (among which the State of Maryland) for their State song. In David Well's arrangement the song is first heard as many of us know it. After this introduction, however, it is transformed into a solid rock version, and the beat has been changed. In the second part the familiar three-four time is back, but here the rhythm is different from the original. After the richly ornamented rock beat the basic theme can be heard once again and the composition is concluded in a festive manner.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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