Searching for Brass Band Music? Visit the Brass Band Music Shop
We've found 12 matches for your search

Results

  • £225.00

    Amsterdam Suite (Concert Band - Score and Parts) - Curtis, Matthew - Noble, Paul

    The Amsterdam Suite, written in 1995 and first performed by the Slaithwaite Philharmonic Orchestra the following year, seeks to convey some impressions of a city I have visited several times. It opens with the waltz sequence, Barrel Organs, recalling the hurdy-gurdies positioned at strategic points in the city with the aim of parting tourists with their loose change. The tunes, however, are mine rather than an attempt to reproduce the real thing. Amsterdam takes its Saturday nights seriously, with the result that those who get up (or are still up) early on Sunday morning will find themselves in eerily deserted streets, whose atmosphere to me suggests one instrument above all, the saxophone, which plays a prominent part in Lonely City. The Saturday nights themselves are depicted in Trams and Crowds. I have taken liberties with the chronology for the obvious musical reason of wanting to go out with a bang rather than a whimper. The basic structure is very much that used by Eric Coates for similar piece, a bustling outer section with a quick march trio, presented in a fuller and more embellished orchestration on each of its three appearances. - Matthew Curtis.

     PDF View Music

  • £85.00

    Amsterdam Suite, 1st Movement (Concert Band - Score and Parts) - Curtis, Matthew - Noble, Paul

    The Amsterdam Suite, written in 1995 and first performed by the Slaithwaite Philharmonic Orchestra the following year, seeks to convey some impressions of a city I have visited several times. It opens with the waltz sequence, Barrel Organs, recalling the hurdy-gurdies positioned at strategic points in the city with the aim of parting tourists with their loose change. The tunes, however, are mine rather than an attempt to reproduce the real thing. Amsterdam takes its Saturday nights seriously, with the result that those who get up (or are still up) early on Sunday morning will find themselves in eerily deserted streets, whose atmosphere to me suggests one instrument above all, the saxophone, which plays a prominent part in Lonely City. The Saturday nights themselves are depicted in Trams and Crowds. I have taken liberties with the chronology for the obvious musical reason of wanting to go out with a bang rather than a whimper. The basic structure is very much that used by Eric Coates for similar piece, a bustling outer section with a quick march trio, presented in a fuller and more embellished orchestration on each of its three appearances. - Matthew Curtis.

     PDF View Music

  • £85.00

    Amsterdam Suite, 2nd Movement (Concert Band - Score and Parts) - Curtis, Matthew - Noble, Paul

    The Amsterdam Suite, written in 1995 and first performed by the Slaithwaite Philharmonic Orchestra the following year, seeks to convey some impressions of a city I have visited several times. It opens with the waltz sequence, Barrel Organs, recalling the hurdy-gurdies positioned at strategic points in the city with the aim of parting tourists with their loose change. The tunes, however, are mine rather than an attempt to reproduce the real thing. Amsterdam takes its Saturday nights seriously, with the result that those who get up (or are still up) early on Sunday morning will find themselves in eerily deserted streets, whose atmosphere to me suggests one instrument above all, the saxophone, which plays a prominent part in Lonely City. The Saturday nights themselves are depicted in Trams and Crowds. I have taken liberties with the chronology for the obvious musical reason of wanting to go out with a bang rather than a whimper. The basic structure is very much that used by Eric Coates for similar piece, a bustling outer section with a quick march trio, presented in a fuller and more embellished orchestration on each of its three appearances. - Matthew Curtis.

     PDF View Music

  • £85.00

    Amsterdam Suite, 3rd Movement (Concert Band - Score and Parts) - Curtis, Matthew - Noble, Paul

    The Amsterdam Suite, written in 1995 and first performed by the Slaithwaite Philharmonic Orchestra the following year, seeks to convey some impressions of a city I have visited several times. It opens with the waltz sequence, Barrel Organs, recalling the hurdy-gurdies positioned at strategic points in the city with the aim of parting tourists with their loose change. The tunes, however, are mine rather than an attempt to reproduce the real thing. Amsterdam takes its Saturday nights seriously, with the result that those who get up (or are still up) early on Sunday morning will find themselves in eerily deserted streets, whose atmosphere to me suggests one instrument above all, the saxophone, which plays a prominent part in Lonely City. The Saturday nights themselves are depicted in Trams and Crowds. I have taken liberties with the chronology for the obvious musical reason of wanting to go out with a bang rather than a whimper. The basic structure is very much that used by Eric Coates for similar piece, a bustling outer section with a quick march trio, presented in a fuller and more embellished orchestration on each of its three appearances. - Matthew Curtis.

     PDF View Music

  • £110.00

    Fiesta (Concert Band - Score and Parts) - Curtis, Matthew - Noble, Paul

    Despite its Spanish title, the concert overture Fiesta is really Italian, recalling a festival that I saw several times as a child in the late 1960s while holidaying in a village at the southern tip of the bay of Naples. The date is August 15, the occasion the feast of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary, celebrated with colourful processions and ritual (some, one imagines, pre-Christian in origin), all rounded off with brass bands and home-made fireworks. - Matthew Curtis. Fiesta was originally written for the orchestra of St. Paul's School in London, It has had performances in London's Queen Elizabeth Hall and the Royal Festival Hall where it opened a live broadcast concert in the BBC's International Festival of Light Music, and has made intermittent appearances on the radio ever since. This arrangement for Wind Band will make an excellent festival opener for accomplished bands and is a sure crowd pleaser with its dynamic flare and energy.

     PDF View Music

  • £75.00

    Outward Bound (Concert Band - Score and Parts) - Curtis, Matthew - Noble, Paul

    Matthew Curtis' music, notable for its melody and orchestral colouring, reflects his conviction, continually reinforced by experience, that the possibilities of traditional tonality and form are far from exhausted and there remains a great longing for more accessible contemporary classical music among performers and audiences alike. Outward Bound is a spirited concert march, filled with energy, melody, excitement, and a piccolo solo in the grandest tradition. It is sure to become a favorite for bands worldwide!

     PDF View Music

  • £61.00

    Animal Kingdom Wind Band Set (Score & Parts)

    In this composition William Vean takes you on a journey through the fascinating and exciting world of animals. Apart from it being a composition filled with "special effects", Animal Kingdom contains many educational elements, such as playing in swing (triplets feeling), chromatics, flutter tonguing, gypsy tuning, varying keys, and, of course, dynamics and articulation. The melodic lines occur in all four voices, as well as in all percussion parts, providing each musician with the opportunity to play a solo or to accompany. Highly recommended for your youth band! William Vean is an educational composer. He knows how to musically shape the special elements from our daily lives. His music is therefore very expressive, containing creative solutions to possible problems. Special ways of playing make his music particularly interesting for the winds, but the percussion section is also featured in his special effects. The world of the animals always plays on ones imagination. In Animal Kingdom, William Vean has portrayed a number of animals in a special manner: Kevin Kangaroo - The jumping character of this animal can be heard in different voices. The swing style also emphasizes the characteristic movements of the kangaroo. Playing in swing style can be practised by using scales. Eddy Elephant - For some of his smaller fellow fauna friends this can be quite an ordeal, but for Eduard (Eddy for friends and intimates) it is his daily walk. Baldrick Bat - Baldrick the Bat is a mysterious character. This can be heard in the fast moving valves and keys, accompanied by special effects in the percussion section. Curtis Camel - Curtis the Camel trudges across the desert, feeling bored. The idea that the horizon will never change does not affect him anymore. He has accepted his fate. The distinctive tones from the gypsy scale provide the suitable oriental sounds. Betty Butterfly - Butterfly Betty elegantly, and without worries, flutters from flower to flower in the garden. Her motto: Carpe Diem (Seize the Day). Betty is a one-day butterfly. Marvin Monkey - A "swing" monkey stirs up the feelings. Even members of the orchestra will look like real monkeys. How about your audience? Each part has its own difficulties and challenges. Important in the first part is playing "in swing" (triplets feeling). This can be practised using scales. In the second part ensemble playing and balance are important. In Baldrick additional information on the effects that have to be played might be useful. "New" sounds are, of course, welcome. Curtis the Camel introduces the gypsy scale. Additional explanation of the use of the scale might be useful. Key changes are interesting in this part. A slight accent on the first beat of the bar will add to the charm of this part. Marvin the Monkey brings back the swing rhythm that was introduced in the first part, alternated by a "straight" part with attention to chromatics and articulation. A story teller will definitely be an asset when performing this composition. 07:30

     PDF View Music

  • £75.00

    Commencement (Concert Band - Score and Parts) - Wilson, Curtis

    This excellent overture was written for the TCU Wind Ensemble. Heroic in character, the piece masterfully exploits the variety of colors available to the modern wind ensemble through interesting solis and solos. This piece is tonal in nature and contains many original and identifiable themes.