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  • £19.95

    THE INTERPRETIVE WIND BAND CONDUCTOR - Knight, John W

    The Interpretive Wind Band Conductor will help conductors make the creative leap from simply reading notes to insightful musical interpretation. In addition to a long list of topics on conducting and interpretation, it includes in-depth analysis of six masterworks for band, and provides solutions for conducting irregular and non-metrical problems inherent in contemporary music

  • £19.95

    CONDUCTOR, TEACHER, LEADER - Lisk, Edward S

    Listening skills, harmonic and melodic content, ensemble sonority and expressive conducting are only a few of the insightful topics that Ed List offers to the creative director in his latest publication. He presents a thorough discussion of the complexities of instrumental music as related to Howard Gardner's Theories of Multiple Ingelligences and provides and overwhelming foundation for support of music in the school.s

  • £19.95

    ON BECOMING A CONDUCTOR - Battisti, Frank L

    Lessons and Meditations on the Art of Conducting. This incredible book by one of the world's foremost authorities on conducting contains no conducting patterns, and no advice on how to conduct any piece. Instead, it focuses on the skills, knowledge and experiences needed to become and function as a conductor-teacher

  • £11.75

    SYMPHONIC WARM-UPS FOR BAND (Conductor Score) - Smith, Claude T

    Claude Smith's contemporary approach to teaching technique, tone and style is written in a variety of keys and meters and is divided into three sections: I. Scale Studies II. Etudes III. Chorale Studies. The etudes and chorales are in progressive order of difficulty so bands of all levels can find appropriate starting places and progress from there. It's the perfect way to begin every rehearsal.

  • £41.70

    Our Conductor - Wim Laseroms

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days
  • £148.00

    Rubicon - Bert Appermont

    The Rubicon is a river in Northern Italy which Julius Caesar crossed with his army in 49 BC in defiance of the leaders of Rome, who feared his power. A civil war against rival Pompey ensued, which culminated in Caesar seizing power as the absolute ruler of Rome. The phrase "crossing the Rubicon" therefore refers to any person committing himself irrevocably to a risky, decisive and irrevocable of course of action.The work consists of three parts that deal with this important moment in history. Part 1 (Meditation) symbolises Caesars request to the Gods to assist him in his difficult choice. In a slow introduction we hear the melancholy and beseeching sounds of the duduk (alternatively, this part can be played by a soprano saxophone) and of the soprano solo singer over the bourdon accompaniment. The soprano solo singer then sings "dona tibi pacem" (give him rest) in a melodious and probing theme.In Part 2 (Battle of Pharsalus) trumpets and trombones resound alternately in a stately Roman fanfare, producing a stereophonic effect. This develops into a martial theme in which Caesars impressive army goes to battle against the army of rival Pompey. While the theme of Caesars army fades away, Pompeys theme emerges as a naive dance in six-eight time. His army is definitely in the majority and it believes it can easily defeat the enemy. Suddenly trumpets and trombones clash on two sides of the orchestra: Caesars army advances and attacks. A fierce battle ensues in which the two themes are played alternately as well as simultaneously. Thanks to his shrewd battle tactics, Caesar manages to win this legendary battle after all: his theme resounds ever louder in trumpets and horns until everything dies out and changes into a kind of reconciliation between the soldiers of the two armies. The melancholy "dona tibi pacem" from part 1 now serves as a reconciliation theme.Caesar is now the sole ruler of the New Roman Empire, which would be destined to leave its mark on our Western civilisation to this day. The third part is a sparkling succession of dance music (Dance) with many Greek and Roman elements in which Caesars victory is praised and celebrated. It is common knowledge that the culture (arts, gods, etc.) of the Romans drew heavily on Greek culture. I have therefore used an authentic Greek theme (the Seikolos song) several times in this part (bar 17 in the euphonium, bar 60 in the base section, bar 68 in the soprano saxophone) to suggest the music of that era and to evoke the right atmosphere. After a gradual increase in tempo in the entire orchestra, the opening melody gloriously resounds once more, surrounded by virtuoso dance music. The work ends with bombastic brass fanfares in which Caesars theme triumphs once more.NOTE FOR THE CONDUCTOR:The Armenian duduk and the monochord that are used in the introduction give a special tone to the music, but could be substituted (soprano saxophone instead of the duduk) or left out (monochord). The soprano solo is also doubled within the orchestra and could therefore also be left out if necessary, although it does provide the work with an extra dimension. The male voices in the introduction and the finale could possibly be replaced with a synthesizer with choral setting.As a visual and acoustic element in part 2, the trumpets, the e-flat cornet, the small drum and trombones can be stood up and placed at two sides of the orchestra (bar 80).Seen from the point of view of the conductor, put the trumpets, the e-flat cornet and the small drum in the left section and the trombones in the right section of the orchestra. This also helps to create a visual contrast between the two themes of the second part. The players can be seated again at bar 97 or bar 121. The soprano soloist can be placed in or in front of the orchestra, depending on what gives the best result. For the conclusion of the work the soprano solo can be sung from afar (from the wings) to create additional atmosphere.This work was composed especially for the "St Joseph" brass band from Pey/Echt (Belgium) with conductor Mark Prils.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £80.60

    Norwegian Dance No. 1 - Alfred Evensen - Kjell Martinsen

    Alfred Evensen (1883 - 1942) was born in Troms, but moved to Harstad 16 years old to start as a student at The Military School of Music. He was director and chief of the military band in 1918, and worked there for 12 years. In 1930 he was appointed to conductor of the military band in Bergen, and worked there until he was appointed to take over from Johannes Hanssen (Valdres march) as manager and conductor of the military band in Oslo in 1934.With this band he participated in a major international military music collection in Paris in 1935 With a great success. In addition to his work in military music, he was a highly respected conductor of choir and composed, in additionto his compositions for bands, many songs for choir. He died in Oslo, after he was arrested because of his resistance against the German occupation. At his own request he was buried in Harstad, and there is also a statue of him.Norwegian Dance No. 1 and No. 2 dates from 1911 and 1912 respectively. They are composed in the style of Grieg's Norwegian Dances, Op. 35, but, unlike Grieg, Evensen has used his own themes for the compositions.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days
  • £69.00

    Conductor's March - Thomas Doss

    Conductor's March is a deft and witty concert march. A conductor should always strive to motivate his musicians and to stay one step ahead of his orchestra—this is the motto and idea behind this piece. First it takes the form of a drum solo which represents the constantly driving force of the conductor. Gradually the musicians fall into line and eventually a cheerful music-making ensemble emerges.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £80.60

    Norwegian Dance No. 2 - Alfred Evensen - Kjell Martinsen

    Alfred Evensen (1883 - 1942) was born in Troms, but moved to Harstad 16 years old to start as a student at The Military School of Music. He was director and chief of the military band in 1918, and worked there for 12 years. In 1930 he was appointed to conductor of the military band in Bergen, and worked there until he was appointed to take over from Johannes Hanssen (Valdres march) as manager and conductor of the military band in Oslo in 1934.With this band he participated in a major international military music collection in Paris in 1935 With a great success. In addition to his work in military music, he was a highly respected conductor of choir and composed, in additionto his compositions for bands, many songs for choir. He died in Oslo, after he was arrested because of his resistance against the German occupation. At his own request he was buried in Harstad, and there is also a statue of him.Norwegian Dance No. 1 and No. 2 dates from 1911 and 1912 respectively. They are composed in the style of Grieg's Norwegian Dances, Op. 35, but, unlike Grieg, Evensen has used his own themes for the compositions.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days
  • £5.50

    More Cowbell - By Mark Williams

    "More Cowbell" was inspired by the famous television skit featuring a rock band, a record producer, and an over-zealous cowbell player. If the cowbell player is good at hamming it up (and rocking out!), you could try the following staging suggestions: Cowbell player plays with intensity and lots of movement, and starts moving in measure 17 toward the front of the band, ending up next to the conductor in measure 24, bowing to the audience on beat 4. Conductor gives a stern look and gestures to student to get back in the percussion section (possibilities: "slit throat" gesture with side of first finger followed by pointing forcefully to the back, or similar gestures). Student slinks back, starts playing cowbell again, but quietly this time. Playing gradually picks up intensity, and player starts again toward the front in measure 41, reaching the front by measure 48. In measure 48, either A) Conductor waves hands violently for student to stop, or B) have a couple of students place a large blanket over the cowbell player. This works, but only for one measure (player quits and doesn't move in bar 49). Cowbell player resumes playing with a vengeance in measure 50 (either in spite of the teacher or under the blanket!). Make sure your new "rock star" takes another bow at the end of the piece. Have fun, and may your life always have "More Cowbell"! Correlated with Accent on Achievement, Book 1, page 27. (1:54) This title is available in SmartMusic.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days